Prison Break The Conspiracy

April 7, 2010 at 4:37 am | Posted in PS3 Reviews, Reviews, Xbox 360 Reviews | Leave a comment
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So, I’m not going to lie to you guys. Prison Break was one of the LAST television shows I was expecting to have an accompanying game after its final series. It just didn’t seem to fit. And again, after giving up watching after they got themselves caught in yet ANOTHER prison come season three, the almighty words of ‘lowe that’ came forth from my mouth and I didn’t lay eyes on Prison Break again up until the finale, not the ending I can imagine most people had hoped for, but better than others or even at least it knows when to stop. Hell yeah I’m looking at you Lost. But that’s enough of that. Focus. Prison Break; The Conspiracy.

Prison Break The Conspiracy, is well. Basically, Prison Break. Spanning that of the first season set in, you guessed it. Prison. The ‘conspiracy’ side of it, comes from more of the actually conspiracy learned from Season 2 onwards in which a incredibly named group only known as…The Company, wants to ensure that Lincoln Burrows goes down for the murder of the Vice Presidents brother. With Lincoln’s baby bro getting involved in the mix. The Company are suspicious and send in Agent Tom Paxton, to find out what Schofield is up to, and to ensure Lincoln takes the fall.

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The game itself is a rather balanced mix of stealth and combat. Usually, if you’re not wondering around the prisons recreational areas throwing punches and landing head butts on passers by, you’re usually sneaking around the rooftops or behind the scenes of the prisons.

The stealth is usually easy to grasp, only the stealth sections are incredibly easy as the game has so many checkpoints. This makes a majority of the sneaking sections just a quick case of trial and error, even the harder stealth areas, a quick being seen and restarting and you’re instantly back where you were, getting it right. Or getting it wrong. Again

The combat is perhaps a little less simple. The combat is really one button style, however unlike a game with a similar set-up like Fable 2, combat is bulky and sluggish.

There are quick and heavy punches but no combos to play around with. Usually resulting in each punch being slow or hard to merge to keep attacks coming smooth and at a pace. There are reversals and blocks but no real indication of when to block to initiate the reversal and when you do, there is a lightening fast Quick Time Event to press, which you usually end up missing, its also hard to gauge a sense depth perception as the camera adopts an over the shoulder position but just at that awkward sort of angle. Which makes it difficult to judge whether your punch will connect with some chumps jaw, or if you’ll be swinging your fists around in the air. You even get the idea the game can’t really figure it out either when you’re practically stood on a fallen enemy, trying to press the stomp button only to find, ol’ Paxton is still punching air. You show that gas whose boss mate…

Clambering about the prison and its areas are made easy with a Mirrors Edge style of highlighting what’s actually climbable and what isn’t with a yellow block. The colour doesn’t look as out of place as it did in Mirrors, but the idea of it works just as well, making finding your way around the back end of the facilities a lot more easier.

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Our missions usually include meeting and greeting familiar faces within the actual Prison Break series, including that of Teabag, Sucre and C-Note. Majority of your actual missions will sometimes be to get in these guys good books, usually ending where you’re finding medical items for someone, but you need a lock pick. So to get a lock pick, you’ve got to get a weapon for someone else, and so on and so on.

And where would we be in a game this century without more QTE’s? That’s right, certain cut scenes or action scenes have a few QTE’s chucked in for good measure, unfortunately. Prison Breaks QTE’s are some good examples of how NOT to do them.

With most people, we like to be given even the teeniest bit of warning when a QTE appears, rather than a small circle, the size of a 5 pence piece appearing on our screen indicating us to press a button. There’s also no delay time with it. So if you don’t press it the instant it appears, game over. They also abuse the habit of having us hammer one button for a period of time, only to switch to something only needed to press once. Again, without warning. So after hammering X, the 5 pence turns to a Y and whoops. Your still hammering X because you weren’t given time. Yet another Con to add to why Quick Time Events are the devil of video gaming techniques.

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Voices from almost all of the original cast even make a return for the game, which is a nice little touch. Makes the whole thing a little more like a real tie in with the actual story rather than just some quick game chucked on a series with no real attachment. It’s all been done before, you know it.

The game itself obviously ends with the end of Season 1, but there’s a whole 9 chapters of meeting old and new characters and a good sized campaign. There is a versus mode, in which you can take any of the characters involved in the game, and play as them in a 2 player Tekken style beat em up in a sort of Fight Club style setting. It’s a nice little idea and fun in some ways. But with clogged and slow fighting it can loose its appeal incredibly quick. Especially if you have Tekken 6 or something similar you can always chuck in with your mate there.

Prison Break isn’t perfect. With its main fault being its combat, it’s a real let done as it makes up about a third of what you’ll be doing for a majority of the game. But with that said, the rest of the game at times can make up for it, and as TV/Film to game conversions go, its definitely one of the better titles. Something Prison Break fans will enjoy, but also. Something non PB fans would too.

6.4

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